DDH Decorating Ideas


Arranging Objects by marygilliatt
September 16, 2010, 1:53 pm
Filed under: Decorating, Interior Design, Living Room, Mary Gilliatt | Tags: , ,

Actually, there are two quite different schools of thought on the possession and display of objects: the school of simplicity and the school for comfortable clutter.  The offering up of one or two exquisite and interesting pieces; or an accretion of possessions and collections that is often called, rather aptly, memorabilia.

"...possessions must also be organized to display it to its best advantage." Photo: Mary Gilliatt's Home Comforts with Style

The trouble about the first school is that a few beautiful or singularly interesting objects really must be beautiful or singularly interesting. Or at least made to appear so by the way they are displayed or mounted. The difficulty about the second is that the ‘clutter’ or enthusiastic accretion of possessions must also be organized to display it to its best advantage. This involves a careful assemblage of texture and shape and color not to mention placement.  For after all, what you are creating still lives in just the same way as that of a painter or a photographer.

"Very small things like decorative shells or stones or marbles can be put into large glass goblets or specimen jars and displayed on windowsills or on shelves." Photo: Mary Gilliatt's Home Comforts with Style

Collections of small objects should always be grouped together rather than scattered sparsely around a house or an apartment.  Very small things like decorative shells or stones or marbles can be put into large glass goblets or specimen jars and displayed on windowsills or on shelves.  Slightly larger objects, however different, should be grouped so that they have something in common such as color, national origin or period, or, alternatively, contrasted with larger, quite different things for the interest of the juxtaposition.  Add a plant for example, or a simple arrangement of flowers, or dried grasses, or a big bowl of dried lavender, or a pile of books.   If arrangements are grouped on tables that are also used for the practical dumping of drinks, food, or whatever, leave appropriate space so that the composition will not be ruined.

"Something sculptural will always add to the interest of a room." Photo: Bedrooms by Mary Gilliatt

If arrangements are on a glass shelf or table, lighting them from underneath with a small up light is effective.  If they are not on a transparent surface try lighting them from above with a table lamp or down light recessed into the ceiling, or a miniature spot to give extra brilliance. Interestingly, serious or at least energetic collections of quite commonplace or ordinary but unexpected objects often make for more memorable rooms than much rarer items.  Perhaps this is because one is less impressed by the effect of something one knows to be good, rare or expensive, than by something one had not much thought about before.  (For example, old irons, shoe lasts, small boxes of every sort, snuff boxes, card cases, china toast racks or tea pots or jugs, old commemoration plates, old bottles and pill boxes or jars, baskets, eighteenth and nineteenth century eye glass cases, old locks and keys and small tools, etc.)

Something sculptural, (whether it is from a young contemporary sculptor, or African or Oceanic, pre-Columbian or Oriental, classical figurative or abstract bronze, kinetic or a two-colored construction) will always add to the interest of a room. Mount small pieces on Lucite blocks. Almost all sculpture except standing pieces looks better on some sort of plinth made to scale, whether it is lacquered, painted or natural wood, marble, plaster, fiber or Plexiglass.

How do you arrange your collectibles?

Cheers,
Mary

Mary Gilliat Decor Dream Home

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